Delays and Disappointment: Crossrail’s Snowball Effect

I am currently on holiday in Colombia this week, so I was not expecting to do a longer post until I got back to the UK. Unfortunately, these past few days have brought a barrage of extremely negative news regarding future step-free access schemes in London. At the centre of this disaster is the Crossrail project’s never-ending delays and rising costs. As TfL struggles to get the megaproject under control, everything else, including accessibility, is experiencing severe setbacks.

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London Assembly Transport Committee Report

A few months ago, the London Assembly Transport Committee held a consultation aimed at investigating ways to improve London’s railway network to make it more efficient, more accessible, and fit-for-purpose. Not counting organisations, I was one of 11 members of the public to submit a written response to the consultation, which you can read in my previous post located here. Yesterday, the final report was finally released. While it does contain good recommendations to achieve a network that is reliable, welcoming, and that has metro-like frequencies, I found the report to be lacking in detail and its proposals for accessibility were far below what I expected.

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DfT’s Inclusive Transport Strategy

Today the Department for Transport released a report detailing the future development of accessible transport, with the ambitious goal that the UK’s transport network will offer equal access to disabled people by 2030. It covers a very broad spectrum of topics, including staff training, passenger rights, and investment in infrastructure. The publication can be read in its entirety here. Continue reading DfT’s Inclusive Transport Strategy